At times it is necessary to "kill your projects" or "murder your darlings" or "trim the fat from your development slate." All three of these things mean the same thing: you've wasted time, money, and energy creating a project, and now isn't the time for it to come to fruition. I've seen too many friends get obsessed with projects that are doomed for failure. So listen to this advice!

9 questions to ask yourself to see if you should kill a film project:

1. Is the team you're working with less motivated about the project as they were on day one? If the answer is yes, consider killing the project.

2. Is your project moving along much more slowly than you had planned? If the answer is yes, consider killing the project.

3. Are you now realizing you will face several costly legal challenges to get your project off the ground? If the answer is yes, consider killing the project.

4. Did a key subject drop out of the project? If the answer is yes, consider killing the project.

5. Has the conflict eroded from your project? If the answer is yes, consider killing the project.

6. Is another team, perhaps with better access, further along on a similar or related project? If the answer is yes, consider killing the project.

7. Have you lost interest in your project? If the answer is yes, consider killing the project.

8. Has the market for your project gotten significantly smaller? If the answer is yes, consider killing the project.

9. Are you working on better/faster/stronger projects? If the answer is yes, consider killing the project

And of course, if more than one of the above questions is yes, REALLY consider killing the project.

Finally, here is a practical guide of how to kill a film project:

1. Ethically, it is proper to tell your participants you are killing the project. This may free them to work with other filmmakers. You should also let them out of any exclusivity agreements you have.

2. Pay anyone who has done work for you who you owe money to. (Write this off later.)

3. You needn't write a public obituary for your project, as you may want to revive it later on. So move on, don't kvetch about it, and know that deep down you saved yourself a heckuva lot of time, money, and energy to pursue other projects.