There are many myths about the filmmaking process that I hope to debunk as a practitioner. 

1. If you think you can be a filmmaker without being an organized person, you're nuts. You can be the most creative person in the world, but if you can't remember to bring the right lenses, the release forms with you, or the proper drives to your post-production house, you're not making a movie. If you're disorganized you'll drive so many people nuts during the filmmaking process that they'll never want to work with you again. As with many things, organization is the key to success. And it is also the key to being a successful filmmaker who can operate within a budget. 

2. You cannot possibly use every interview that you create in a documentary. In both AMANDA KNOX and EUROTRUMP, we interviewed far more people than we used in our final products. A pair of Dutch journalists recently complained publicly about not making the final cut of EUROTRUMP, but the reality is their English wasn't good enough for us to use and they offered more speculation than facts. (They were also the first people we interviewed so we didn't know we'd have far more relevant interviewees in our final cut.)  It might hurt your interviewees to learn that they don't make the final cut of the film, but because of time limits and other factors this is a reality. In fiction films, there are scenes that will be cut too. The key lesson here is to manage the expectations of interviewees and actors. 

3. When you are done shooting a project, that is only the beginning. So much of a film's creation takes place in the edit, and even more of it will take place in post-production. As fast as I like to make films, I also find myself having to slow down to let the experts in these departments do their work. These processes cannot happen overnight unless you want to sacrifice quality or lose undiscovered gems within your materials. 

4. You don't need a huge crew to make a high quality product. Technology has become so good that these days all you need is a Panasonic Lumix GH5, a couple of decent lenses, and a Zoom H6 recorder. If you have to shoot with these devices alone, you can do it. But I strongly recommend using a 2-person crew, especially in documentary. This enables one person, the Director of Photography, to focus on the shots, while the second person can manage the audio. How you divide up roles between director and producer is up to you and based on your core competencies.